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“Olga” makes her revolution


Elie Grappe is only 27 years old, could have become a classical musician, left Lyon for Switzerland, and made a remarkable debut in cinema.

Olga is a young Ukrainian gymnast who dreams of the Olympic Games when the February 2014 revolution broke out, which killed around 100 people, and whose epicenter was Maidan Square in Kiev. Because her journalist mother is threatened by the regime and because her father is Swiss, Olga can take shelter and continue her preparation with the Swiss team.

“The images of the Maidan revolution filmed on cellphones are fantastical.”

Director Elie Grappe

to franceinfo

But the young woman is torn between her personal ambition and the tragedy that is playing out at home, and that she follows frantically on social networks. Between the hushed comfort of his host country and the chaos of the demonstrations in Ukraine, the contrast is striking, but the organic dimension of the film creates an unexpected link.

The training scenes, remarkably filmed – the lead actress, Anastasia Budiashkina, is herself a gymnast – resonate with the images of the revolution filmed on cellphones by the demonstrators.

Blood oranges by Jean-Christophe Meurisse

Jean-Christophe Meurisse is for 15 years with his theater company The dogs of Navarre an acid chronicler of the time, with his second film Blood oranges he goes far, very far in black humor. A raped young woman who tortures her attacker with delight, an over-indebted retired couple who consider suicide as an act of political rebellion, a minister of the economy who swears not to have stashed money in Switzerland, it is our good. time that speaks Blood oranges, without the slightest restraint as to his cruelty.

I don’t have a casting director

Everything goes there, family relations, the cynicism of our policies, patriarchy but also wokism and if it is so jubilant it is largely thanks to the casting: Blanche Gardin and Denis Podalydès rub shoulders with performers from the theater and ex-Deschiens.

Jean-Christophe Meurisse is for 15 years with his theater company, The dogs of Navarre, an acid chronicler of the time, with his second film Blood oranges he goes far, very far in black humor.

A raped young woman who tortures with delight her attacker, a retired couple in debt who considers suicide as an act of political rebellion, a minister of the economy who swears not to have stashed money in Switzerland, it is good our time that speaks Blood oranges, without the slightest restraint as to his cruelty.

“I don’t have a casting director, I have gained my freedom in the theater.”

Jean-Christophe Meurisse

to franceinfo

Everything goes there, family relations, the cynicism of our policies, patriarchy but also wokism, and if it is also jubilant it is largely thanks to the casting: Blanche Gardin and Denis Podalydès rub shoulders with performers from the theater and ex-Deschiens.

After the very noticed Raid and Much Loved, the Franco-Moroccan director returns to Sidi Moumen, a suburb of Casablanca where he founded a cultural center, it is there with the young boys and girls who come to escape there, that Anas arrives, a former rapper turned teacher, convinced that hip hop will be a tool for emancipation.

Shot with non-professionals, High and loud overflowing with energy, emotion, hope, despite the weight of families and religion. It is also a plea for transmission, Nabil Ayouch admits that he owes a lot to the years spent at the MJC of Sarcelles, in the 80s. And once again, it is the girls who have the most reason to say High and loud who they are.



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